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Simmish

 
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bluesage
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Joined: 31 Aug 2006
Posts: 3480
Location: Albuquerque, NM. USA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2016 1:46 am    Post subject: Simmish Reply with quote

Sims Language.

Understanding Simmish
As posted in "The Sims" Newsgroups.
With permission from Paul .

GabaGoochie
mokeyhokey
TERRA MA!
'This Grau is Fredshay, and ober das now'
Aahh dag dag
a stittle a fink, a stittle a dink...."
noos noos
Ah Souel Souel...

Act 1, scene 1
Her: Er er kentuonasna, watapwa-nerva, mmm?
Him: Terra-Mah! Oh ma, uma na leha Haywawohl eenaweh Veema.

Act 1, scene 2
Him: Meh meh meh shmellamah
Her: Urweh alfwanaweh, ah, KRAZST!
Him: Och napatamelama arratay ehdesuo ehdegala sirrailah howara luh birwateh.
Her: Ey flanuwust, ekay imblam blanuwust (clears throat)

- interval -

Act 2
Her: Disgrau es frenshek, andanoba tasnau enda istufa ganjoulenna...
Him: Gorrntay gigabarla
Her: Fwa, fwa, keesdelie dekcam gwden ishi dowodowodela sneneh!


arubda shnout and matubaramada
"Fenestrat!"
"Craast" and "Touk."
Sul-Sul and burlate
"comonashla"
BOOGERSCHNOTT
Shpaa, shpaa, hoody-doody hoody-doody shpaa
Sum-Sum
Tira mah!
- Huten burwati
Sig a mon shake
ahhhh vessa and yummy
Nah nah! Blah Blah! Newas nakaw why why
cuba da
"Komme Nar
Gwanana, Took!"
Fawah
"Fooshallah",

A lama to krada a daa,
A wubbly kring shala ma,
a kwoddle a ting,
a waddle a sting,
sha kraddle a nimpy la da

Praaaaa, laaaaa, woo caneremy oopa tala daaaa!
dee dop de welle, de dop da bing...
berwati
ooo eoe oo a eooooeoo aowoooo
Pant-a-low?
Hoochie Kiki la la
rrrrrrrrrrrump ba da bi da bi daa, rrrrrrrrrump ba da bi da bi daa
spasiba
petit bonhomme
wa kan da wel saan
"rrrrrwoo
"Taba conneill o taba connez !"
ta da de-deede, ta da da-lala, deedeleee da da da
Mashunoe

Sim1: "Allema!"
Sim 2: "Snamashinae!"
De momen of you hart

Ban dai a baiano,
Ban dai a baiano,
Ban dai a baiano,
Baiano,
Baiano,
Baiano o

Ille-tou Ille-tou
"dabbadoochia!"
heeeeeeey blip blip blip blip
"dum da duddle lum da lum dah!"
Oh Fred dat dum cow

Friend: "Coma nah snala?
Me: "Ina moba da sna"
"ummm, Yummy!"
"lacound
Dim lau....DIM LAU!!!
An a da, An a da!"
"yyy-uck!!"

"Plea blah me bah"
"woo ek eee"
"flea dead mowig"

"Ooo dada ooo?"
bawaska!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For those who have been playing The Sims for longer than a couple of weeks understanding Simmish has been one of the main features of playing The Sims effectively. It has been the subject of many questions asked in the four main Sims newsgroups and is understood, in part at least, by anyone playing the game, regardless of their 'native' language.

People have been reported as saying 'Deg, deg' when they're leaving their homes to go to work or shop, 'Commas nala?' when answering the phone, and even 'Dis graw is fredeshay!' when eating their food! Now, whilst the game may be very addictive, and continuous downloads have forced folks to consider a bigger hard drive, I have yet to experience this strange phenomena first-hand.

Despite this however, people in general think they understand what their Sims are saying in conversation with each other... or do they? Let's take a popular (and more easily understood) phrase, 'Dis graw is fredeshay'. Now the spelling of that phrase is approximate, for Simmish is not a written language. Actually, classifying it as a language at all would be stretching it a little! The phrase could mean a number of things; Livin-It-Up.net (moonsims.asi.org/liu), uses a modification of a well known phrase 'All the news that's fit to print'. In their case, you replace news and fit with 'graw' and 'fredeshay'. However, this would not work in the Sims proper, for the phrase 'Dis graw is fredeshay' would mean 'this news is fit'. Appropriate possibly for reading the newspaper perhaps, but for eating?!? Read on...

'Dis graw is fredeshay', as it turns out when playing the game, can be applied to any number of subjects. When eating, it could be taken to mean 'this food is great/wonderful'. When watching tv, 'this film is fantastic!' or when employing it in general conversation 'this is '. It is a phrase that is interchangeable to suit any topic of conversation.

The same rules apply for another easily comprehendable phrase; 'commas nala'. Like the previous phrase, it can apply to almost every situation. 'commas nala' and it's sister phrase 'burro burro' (approximate spelling based on poor-quality pc-speakers) are based on starter/introductory questioning that your Sims use to strike up a conversation. Essentially, 'commas nala' simply means 'Would you like to...' and tends to be used for phone conversation, whilst 'burro burro' appears to be used to invite friends to participate in something - normally a dance.

Finally, for now, as the Guinness begins to wear off, I move on to 'Deg deg', or 'Dag dag' depending on the player. This simply means 'goodbye' and little more. Two other phrases I've come across for 'good bye' are 'shlendeg' and 'daba duchiya' and appear to be gender/age specific.

In the second part I will expand on the issue of gender and age-specific phrases, but the booze is wearing off now, so I'll go back to playing the game... End of Part One.....

I forgot to mention 'sool sool' as another way of saying 'goodbye'. 'Sool sool' is the female equivalent of 'deg deg'. Regardless of this however, both sexes say 'deg deg'. Thanks to kidoki and Ice Man for pointing that out.

Additionally, 'Sooma tan' can also be used, although this roughly translates as 'see you another time'. AFAIK, this is spoken by both sexes.

This post was originally intended to cover the gender- and age-related differences in Simmish. Unfortunately, as my saved game had decided to bugger up, I 've had to concentrate on a way of making THAT work (cheers Libby) as well as juggle a job and a social life. However, I have done some research (research?! For a game??! Told you I was mad!), and I'm dropping the age-related part of this post simply because there is no way I can translate 'ooh-ahh zazazazazah' into English. And before anyone from the UK mentions it, yes, I did think 'eff-eff eff-eff-eff, eff eff eff-eff-eff-eff-eff, Chris Waddle!' (Courtesy of 'The Fast Show', I think...).

Instead I will concentrate on conversational Simmish and the genderal differences therein. Before a Sim can embark on a conversation, they have do something. This can be eating, watching tv, playing pool or standing around. However, a Sim cannot talk if they are sitting down (doing nothing), repairing an appliance or cleaning up.

Translation attempts are a total guess, based on real-life situations and tones used in conversation. Believe at your own risk.

Sentences are gender-specific and number (I think), four or five per sex (so eight/ten in total, not including annoying Simbrats).

'Mabadalaba rarati! I de shurl e i de selora haw de burwati!' I'm starting off with this sentence because it was mentioned earlier in the week by Robert J. Muldoon and BW, who couldn't decide how the last word sounded. Well, after recording this sentence, and playing it back about 20 times, there is definitely a 't' in burwati! I think the general consensus for the last word here means 'cool' or 'great' as it is the male equivalent to 'fredeshay'. I can neither agree nor disagree with this, as unlike the simple phrases used for greeting/offering, these words tend to be very difficult to associate with English ones. Although 'Dis graw is fredeshay' is a conversational phrase, it is recognisable mainly because it is both short, and the words 'dis' and 'is' sound similar or the same as English 'this' and 'is', so 'graw' and 'fredeshay' can mean whatever the topic of conversation allows it to mean.

'Mabadalaba rararti' is a little more difficult. I think the words 'What about that... the other week/day' springs to mind when hearing this being spoken. This certainly works if you were to conclude that the final word in the sentence is an adjective, so 'What about that the other day?' it *could* work, couldn't it? So what about the second part - 'I de shurl e i selora haw de burati'? Burati could be substituted for any adjective you could think of: cool, good, bad, rubbish etc. It could read 'What about that football match the other day? Don't you think it's a huge pile of rubbish?' Essentially, a starter question to strike up a conversation.

'E hey, robar ne teemee uh but..."roll dai gig bale"'. The middle portion of this one is missing, because like most of the male phrases, there are few actual spoken words, and more mumbling involved. I am given the impression when this is said, that Michael Roomies, or any other male Sim, is quoting something in the sentence. The last portion of the sentence in speech marks, I have put there myself to illustrate the sudden change of tone when these words are said. Now again, interpretation is open to the player, but the tone of this one sounds like someone talking about their day at work (as is 'Tirimah!', which I'll come onto later). 'E hay', in this manner, can be substituted for 'So today...', 'robar ne teemee uh but', 'while I was on my break...'. The middle portion is a mumble, but that might simply be an excuse to use someone's name there, and then continue with '...said, "can I nick one of yer sarnies, mate?". Ok, not realistic, but then again, who actually has anything interesting to say about work?

'Tirimah!' I could never completely grasp any 'words' from the rest of the sentence, so this one will have to do! Tirimah sounds a lot like 'Yeah I remember...!' in tone, but as I've said above, the phrase along with this word, could imply a discussion on work or simply a quick way of grabbing attention, before talking a load of rubbish...

Finally, from the male phrases, a joke: 'Kaplares ne mara, komares tro mraw, e mimis to meli keer!' I didn't find it funny either. But Chris Roomies did. I think you could substitute a joke of your own for this one. Here's mine: 'There was a woman from Venus, whose body was shaped like a...'

Now on to the female conversational phrases, because it's 2.15 AM and I have to be up for work sometime soon...

'Kenwalsh nina ve? Intego voge shiya gool van chee, giye volsh!' Just imagine sitting at the table, tucking in to that pizza you've waited for over two hours for, slowly taking in the various flavours and aromas and putting your mind to rest, when suddenly someone yells this at you! Is it me, or does 'Kenwalsh nina ve' sound like 'Are you listening to me'?. Actually it's probably got more to do with shopping than anything else, this one. Women are women, regardless of it being real-life or a computer game. They will talk about shopping, and now with Hot Date on the market, they can actually do it! How does this sound, '20% off? I'm grabbing my coat and going right now!' (then of course you hear 'Tirimah!' - 'Don't be stupid!')
...And finally...

'Kentvolahs na, wela va nyava?' 'And while we're on the subject, what about '. That's the phrase that always springs to mind, and usually follows the previous sentence. There's very little more to say for this one, except it is one of the few questions that actually provokes a response from the other person. Unfortunately, I have never been able to transliterate the mumbled response, but it seems to be a confirmationary response to the question - a sort of a 'yes' or 'no' type of answer in a sense.

Summary/What have we learned from all this?

1. It's a computer game, and this should always be remembered when people are downloading yet another GB of stuff from the net and people like me try to understand a language that wasn't *meant* to be understood.

2. Simmish is a language that is quite rare in the way that male responses and female responses are completely different, yet understandable to each other. Each Sim can mutually understand one another, even if they never use the same words (except when saying goodbye, or greeting someone).

3. Not all Simmish is understandable. I missed a lot of it out, because it was next to impossible to construct any words from mumbles. Simbrat-speak is particularly problematic in this area.

http://www.mgoforum.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=26382&highlight=snobby


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